Blog Archives

End of Game SLOB: Need 2 (Lob)

I recently watched some video from last year’s Brayden Carr Foundation Coaching Clinic run by coach Jim Carr. This play came from the legendary John Lucas and is a very simple sideline out-of-bounds play from the side that gives you a lob. Main goal of this action is to get the lob to 5 at the rim. However, if the defense takes away the lob you have 4 cutting hard to the top for a catch & shoot as well.

 

Lucas

San Antonio Spurs Rhody Back Side

In their Game 4 win of the 2014 NBA Finals, the San Antonio Spurs ran this half-court set which included a multitude of actions. As soon as 3 cleared 4, 2 was moving to set the backscreen. This timing allowed for 5 to pin-down for 2 and receive the ball on the move popping out. 5 set such a good pick and sealed in the lane that X4 had to help in the lane and allowed for an open throwback to Diaw.

rhodybackside

Creating an Offensive Play Call System (Part 3)

In case you missed Part 1 (Offensive Schemes) and Part 2 (Pick & Rolls Names), make sure you read them after you them as complimentary material to the information below.

Post Actions

When it comes time to put in my post plays, I tag the term “Power” to the end of each play call. In my mind, Power signifies strength and dominance, which I what I hope to create in the post with such actions. Another term commonly used in the NBA that you may prefer is the word “Punch”. For example, “Floppy Punch” is an easy way to call out for your big(s) to duck-in after running your Floppy action. Below are a few of my favorite “Power” (Punch) actions and for the full list check them out in my play library here.

power1

power2

Flare & Backscreen Actions

The last pay calls I am going to discuss are flare screens and backscreen actions. I have grouped these together because they are similar in nature go somewhat hand-in-hand.  I used to tag Flare & Backscreen actions with the same term, “Back”. However, after listening to Coach Stan Van Gundy’s lecture at the 2013 Coaching U Live it is time to make a change. He tags all of his Flare actions with the term, “Chest”. I love using Chest because it not only is it a clear term but is also a teaching moment. Chest, signifying putting the defender you are screening in the middle of your chest with the screen. This will also allow for more consistency with “Back” only meaning actions being back-screened to the rim.

chest

back

I really hope you found this three-part series information and thought-provoking. If there are any topics you would like for me to right about in the future please do not hesitate to reach out to me.

John Pelphrey Carolina Backscreen Action

John Pelphrey ran this Carolina backscreen action while the head coach of the University of Arkansas.  What I love about this play is by have 2 set the backscreen to 4, a lack of communication will result in one of three outcomes:

1. Lob to 4
2. 2 will be open as X2 helped because X4 was nailed on the backscreen
3. X5 is forced to help on 2 and 5 can flash for an elbow jumper or iso-drive to the rim.

If none of those options are available the pick & roll finishes up the play. With the floor spread and the pick so close to the baseline it will be difficult to help on the roll of 5 if X5 is caught helping X2.

Out1

 

Out2

Rhody Back

Rhody back is another simple yet very effective screen the screener post-up play to run after using a rhody cut. In the play below, have 1 delay his dribble to the wing until 2 almost reaches the point of the screen from 4. This will occupy X4 for a second before being hit with the backscreen. If X3 and X4 do a poor job communicating on the backscreen and overload to the post, 3 will be open after the pin down from 5.

rhodyback

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